The Great Flood of 2011

If you haven’t heard anything about the flooding in the Central U.S; it’s because the Mainstream Media has been ‘blacked-out’ by our Government..The flooding is only going to get worse and it’s starting to look like the map that the NOAA put out a couple years ago… Weird! This story is still developing and we will add more information as it comes available! For Now: Read The Information And Watch The Videos Below.. Something is up…

Now that’s what the NOAA predicted what would happen in the near future..Pretty Scary! Now it’s weird how Alex Jones has not mentioned a thing about this upcoming disaster!? I feel really bad for those that are stuck right not.. The infrastructure in America is falling apart and it’s only going to make the disaster worse! The Army Corps of Engineers is now claiming that the water will rise over 15 feet.. The Flood gates have been opening up and really that only makes it worse! The reason why is because all of the reserves/dams are already filled to the top; so that means they are only creating a domino effect…Do they know what they’re doing?! We have also been getting reports that FEMA, The National Guard and Police/Military have been driving around towns to make sure people have ‘evacuated’ from their homes..

Why is there a Media Blackout on Nuclear Incident at Fort Calhoun in Nebraska?

Since flooding began on June 6th, there has been a disturbingly low level of media attention given to the crisis at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Facility near Omaha, Nebraska. But evidence strongly suggests that something very serious has in fact happened there.

On June 7th, there was a fire reported at Fort Calhoun. The official story is that the fire was in an electrical switchgear room at the plant. The apparently facility lost power to a pump that cools the spent fuel rod pool, allegedly for a duration of approximately 90 minutes.

The following sequence of events is documented on the Omaha Public Power District’s own website, stating among other things, that here was no such imminent danger with the Fort Calhoun Station spent-fuel pool, and that due to a fire in an electrical switchgear room at FCS on the morning of June 7, the plant temporarily lost power to a pump that cools the spent-fuel pool.

In addition to the flooding that has occurred on the banks of the Missouri River at Fort Calhoun, the Cooper Nuclear Facility in Brownville, Nebraska may also be threatened by the rising flood waters.

As was declared at Fort Calhoun on June 7th, another “Notification of Unusual Event” was declared at Cooper Nuclear Station on June 20th. This notification was issued because the Missouri River’s water level reached an alarming 42.5 feet. Apparently, Cooper Station is advising that it is unable to discharge sludge into the Missouri River due to flooding, and therefore “overtopped” its sludge pond.

Not surprisingly, and completely ignored by the Mainstream Media, these two nuclear power facilities in Nebraska were designated temporary restricted NO FLY ZONES by the FAA in early June. The FAA restrictions were reportedly down to “hazards” and were ‘effectively immediately’, and ‘until further notice’. Yet, according to the NRC, there’s no cause for the public to panic.

A news report from local NBC 6 on the Ft. Calhoun Power Plant and large areas of farm land flooded by the Missouri River, interviews a local farmer worried about the levees, “We need the Corps-Army Corps of Engineers–to do more. The Corps needs to tell us what to do and where to go. This is not mother nature, this is man-made.” Nearby town Council Bluffs has already implemented its own three tier warning system should residents be prepared to leave the area quickly.


On June 6, 2011, the Federal Aviation Administration put into effect ‘temporary flying restrictions’–until further notice–over the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant in Blaine, Nebraska.

To date, no one can confirm whether or not the Ft Calhoun Nuclear incident is at a Level 4 emergency on a US regulatory scale. A Level 4 emergency would constitute an “actual or imminent substantial core damage or melting of reactor fuel with the potential for loss of containment integrity.” According to the seven-level International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale, a Level 4 incident requires at least one death, which has not occurred according to available reports.

According a recent report on the People’sVoice website, The Ft. Calhoun plant — which stores its fuel rods at ground level according to Tom Burnett – is now partly submerged and Missouri River levels are expected to rise further before the summer if finished, local reports in and around the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant suggest that the waters are expected to rise at least 5 more feet.

Burnett states, “Ft. Calhoun is the designated spent fuel storage facility for the entire state of Nebraska…and maybe for more than one state. Calhoun stores its spent fuel in ground-level pools which are underwater anyway – but they are open at the top. When the Missouri river pours in there, it’s going to make Fukushima look like an X-Ray.”


The People’s Voice’s report explains how Ft Calhoun and Fukushima share some of the very same high-risk factors:

“In 2010, Nebraska stored 840 metric tons of the highly radioactive spent fuel rods, reports the Nuclear Energy Institute. That’s one-tenth of what Illinois stores (8,440 MT), and less than Louisiana (1,210) and Minnesota (1,160). But it’s more than other flood-threatened states like Missouri (650) and Iowa (420).”

Conventional wisdom about what makes for a safe location regarding nuclear power facilities was turned on its head this year following Japan’s Fukushima disaster following the earthquake and tsunami which ravaged the region and triggered one of the planets worst-ever nuclear meltdowns.

As was the critical event in Fukushima, in Ft Calhoun circulatin­g water is required at all times to keep the new fuel and more importantl­y the spent radioactive material cool. The Nebraska facility houses around 600,000 – 800,000 pounds of spent fuel that must be constantly cooled to prevent it from starting to boil, so the reported 90 minute gap in service should raise alarm bells.

Since flooding began on June 6th, there has been a disturbingly low level of media attention given to the crisis at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Facility near Omaha, Nebraska. But evidence strongly suggests that something very serious has in fact happened there.

On June 7th, there was a fire reported at Fort Calhoun. The official story is that the fire was in an electrical switchgear room at the plant. The apparently facility lost power to a pump that cools the spent fuel rod pool, allegedly for a duration of approximately 90 minutes.


FORT CALHOUN NUKE SITE: does it pose a public risk?

The following sequence of events is documented on the Omaha Public Power District’s own website, stating among other things, that here was no such imminent danger with the Fort Calhoun Station spent-fuel pool, and that due to a fire in an electrical switchgear room at FCS on the morning of June 7, the plant temporarily lost power to a pump that cools the spent-fuel pool.

In addition to the flooding that has occurred on the banks of the Missouri River at Fort Calhoun, the Cooper Nuclear Facility in Brownville, Nebraska may also be threatened by the rising flood waters.

As was declared at Fort Calhoun on June 7th, another “Notification of Unusual Event” was declared at Cooper Nuclear Station on June 20th. This notification was issued because the Missouri River’s water level reached an alarming 42.5 feet. Apparently, Cooper Station is advising that it is unable to discharge sludge into the Missouri River due to flooding, and therefore “overtopped” its sludge pond.

Not surprisingly, and completely ignored by the Mainstream Media, these two nuclear power facilities in Nebraska were designated temporary restricted NO FLY ZONES by the FAA in early June. The FAA restrictions were reportedly down to “hazards” and were ‘effectively immediately’, and ‘until further notice’. Yet, according to the NRC, there’s no cause for the public to panic.


FORT CALHOUN: Under water now. Is it potentially the next Fukushima?

A news report from local NBC 6 on the Ft. Calhoun Power Plant and large areas of farm land flooded by the Missouri River, interviews a local farmer worried about the levees, “We need the Corps-Army Corps of Engineers–to do more. The Corps needs to tell us what to do and where to go. This is not mother nature, this is man-made.” Nearby town Council Bluffs has already implemented its own three tier warning system should residents be prepared to leave the area quickly.

On June 6, 2011, the Federal Aviation Administration put into effect ‘temporary flying restrictions’–until further notice–over the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant in Blaine, Nebraska.

To date, no one can confirm whether or not the Ft Calhoun Nuclear incident is at a Level 4 emergency on a US regulatory scale. A Level 4 emergency would constitute an “actual or imminent substantial core damage or melting of reactor fuel with the potential for loss of containment integrity.” According to the seven-level International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale, a Level 4 incident requires at least one death, which has not occurred according to available reports.

Nuclear engineer Arnie Gundersen explains how cooling pumps must operate continuously, even years after a plant is shut down.

According a recent report on the People’sVoice website, The Ft. Calhoun plant — which stores its fuel rods at ground level according to Tom Burnett – is now partly submerged and Missouri River levels are expected to rise further before the summer if finished, local reports in and around the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant suggest that the waters are expected to rise at least 5 more feet.

Burnett states, “Ft. Calhoun is the designated spent fuel storage facility for the entire state of Nebraska…and maybe for more than one state. Calhoun stores its spent fuel in ground-level pools which are underwater anyway – but they are open at the top. When the Missouri river pours in there, it’s going to make Fukushima look like an X-Ray.”


The People’s Voice’s report explains how Ft Calhoun and Fukushima share some of the very same high-risk factors:

“In 2010, Nebraska stored 840 metric tons of the highly radioactive spent fuel rods, reports the Nuclear Energy Institute. That’s one-tenth of what Illinois stores (8,440 MT), and less than Louisiana (1,210) and Minnesota (1,160). But it’s more than other flood-threatened states like Missouri (650) and Iowa (420).”

Conventional wisdom about what makes for a safe location regarding nuclear power facilities was turned on its head this year following Japan’s Fukushima disaster following the earthquake and tsunami which ravaged the region and triggered one of the planets worst-ever nuclear meltdowns.

As was the critical event in Fukushima, in Ft Calhoun circulatin­g water is required at all times to keep the new fuel and more importantl­y the spent radioactive material cool. The Nebraska facility houses around 600,000 – 800,000 pounds of spent fuel that must be constantly cooled to prevent it from starting to boil, so the reported 90 minute gap in service should raise alarm bells.

Nebraska’s nuclear plant’s similarities to Japan’s Fukushima, both were store houses for years of spent nuclear fuel rods.

In addition to all this, there are eyewitness reports of odd military movements, including unmarked vehicles and soldiers. Should a radiation accident occur, most certainly extreme public controls would be enacted by the military, not least because this region contains some of the country’s key environmental, transportation and military assets.

RISK: Levees in and around Omaha were not designed for 3 months of water.

Angela Tague at Business Gather reports also that the recent Midwest floods may seriously impact food and gas prices. Lost farmland may be behind the price spike to $7.55 a bushel for corn, already twice last year’s price. Tague notes also:

“Corn is a key ingredient in ethanol gasoline, feeds America’s livestock and is found in many food products including soft drinks and cereal. Prices will undoubtedly increase steadily at the grocery store, gas pump and butcher shop throughout the summer as Midwest flooding continues along the Missouri River basin. Not only are farmers losing their homes, land and fields — ultimately their bank accounts will also suffer this season.”

One of the lessons we can learn for Japan’s tragic Fukushima disaster is that the government’s choice to impose a media blackout on information around the disaster may have already cost thousands of lives. Only time will tell the scope the disaster and how many victims it will claim.

More importantly, though, is that public officials might do well to reconsider the “safe” and “green” credentials of nuclear power- arguably one of the dirtiest industries going today. Especially up for inspection are those of 40 year old facilities like Ft Calhoun in the US, strangely being re-licensed for operation past 2030. Many of these facilities serve little on the electrical production front, and are more or less “bomb factories” that produce material for nuclear weapons and depleted uranium munitions.

Source

More Floodgates Opened at the Morganza Spillway

The Army Corps of Engineers opened two additional gates at the Mississippi River’s Morganza Spillway today, unleashing a wall of water which is now flowing into the spillway at a rate greater than that of Niagara Falls, more than 100,000 cubic feet per second.

At that rate it would take just over an hour and a half to cover the entire island of Manhattan in a foot of water. So far only 11 of the 125 gates have been opened and the Corps plans to open more as the river rises.

The Corps began flooding the spillway on Saturday, opening the floodgates for the first time in 40 years. The goal is to divert the record high waters of the Mississippi away from Baton Rouge and New Orleans, choosing to risk smaller communities in an attempt to avert disaster in the most populous cities.

The Mississippi River crest is not expected to arrive at the Morganza spillway for at least a week and mandatory evacuations are already under way in many places. Neighborhoods in the water’s path have turned to ghost towns with sheriff’s deputies and members of the National Guard going door to door telling residents to pack up and get out.

Read More Here

NRC tracking flooding at two Nebraska nuclear power plants

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) said Wednesday it was closely monitoring conditions along the Missouri River, where floodwaters were rising at Nebraska Public Power District’s Cooper Nuclear Station and Omaha Public Power District’s Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant in Nebraska.

“Cooper is operating at full power. Fort Calhoun shut down for a refueling outage on April 7 and operators have decided not to restart the plant until flood waters recede,” the release said.

The NRC said that both plants had made extensive preparations to protect the sites against rising floodwaters.

Flooding had forced evacuation of a northwest Missouri town because of two breaches in Missouri River levees and expectations of more rain.

Flooding could complicate the restart of the Fort Calhoun plant as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers expects record water release from the federal dams along the Missouri River to continue until mid-August, keeping river levels high.

Source

Minot, N.D., floods and thousands evacuate

As many as 10,000 people raced to evacuate the area Wednesday as water from the Souris River began spilling over the levees in Minot, N.D.

A few hundred of the evacuees went to temporary city shelters, some stayed on friends’ couches, under tents or in vehicles, and others scrambled to find somewhere to go. The region has few vacancies under normal circumstances, thanks largely to the state’s oil boom.

The water is expected to reach record levels over the coming days in parts of Minot, an Air Force town, as the little-known waterway of Souris swells from rain and snowmelt and inundates thousands of homes and businesses.

Source

Missouri River flooding makes travel challenging

Flooding along the Missouri River was making it difficult to get around Wednesday in the region where Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri come together and was forcing residents in at least two communities to build levees to protect infrastructure.

Interstate 29 was shut down in the area, and every bridge across the river was closed from St. Joseph, Mo., to Omaha, Neb., the St. Joseph News-Press reported Wednesday. So were sections of several other major roadways, including U.S. 275 and U.S. 136 in northwest Missouri.

The Missouri Department of Transportation said parts of I-29 are expected to be closed through mid-August, recalling the Flood of 1993, when traveling across the Missouri and Mississippi rivers in parts of the Midwest was virtually impossible.

In northwest Missouri, a breach in Holt County’s Mill Creek levee sent more water into the evacuated town of Corning and threatened I-29 about 11 miles south of where the highway was already closed in Atchison County.

Source


Videos

Fort Calhoun nuclear plant new Fukushima?

Arnie Gundersen – Nebraska Nuclear Plant: Emergency Level 4 & Getting Worse

Thom Hartmann: Nuclear Power – “We Almost Lost Nebraska”

Aerials of Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant Flooding

Video By YouTube User About The Flooding Events


Links

New Threat: More rain that could intensify floods

North Dakota River Continues Flooding

Metro River Level Nearly Six Feet Above Flood Stage

Mo. farmers working to to reduce dead zone in Gulf of Mexico

Furious effort to raise levees in N. Dakota city

Mississippi River Flooding (Photos)

Western flood watch focuses on Gavins Point Dam surge

Floods Again Force Families to Evacuate Minot, North Dakota

Blunt says Congress will challenge Army Corps’ Missouri River plan

Could Nebraska flooding create a nuclear safety risk?

Council Bluffs residents warned to take flood precautions

Remember this is still breaking news!! New links are being updated and added to Google every hour.. Keep a look our for videos and stories.. I’ll be updating this post or creating another when more information comes available.. If you have any information you would like to add please send me an email at tips@usahitman.com or send me a tweet at @usahitman_com

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