Smart meters to track dementia patients

The NHS is to use energy smart meters to monitor dementia patients in their homes.

The devices will track patients’ daily routines, such as when they boil the kettle, cook dinner or turn the washing machine on.

They will flag up any sudden change in behavior which could indicate an illness, a fall or a decline in their mental state. The meters will be able to send alerts to family members or carers, who can pop round to check if the patient is all right.

Experts say the devices will enable patients to live independently for longer without going into care, and prevent avoidable admissions to A&E. Smart meters monitor households’ energy use in real time and send the readings directly to suppliers, putting an end to estimated bills.

Ministers have promised to install the devices in every home by 2020 to reduce energy consumption, but the rollout is massively over budget and behind schedule. 

Researchers at Liverpool John Moores University and the Mersey Care NHS Trust plan to carry out the initial dementia trial on 50 patients, beginning in October. 

This will test the ability of the meters to monitor patients’ health and the general progression of their disease. If successful, the trial will be extended to involve 1,000 patients across four NHS trusts.

The smart meters involved in the dementia study can monitor patients’ energy use every ten seconds. They will be connected to a central computer system which will learn patients’ daily routines, such as when they normally use certain electrical appliances.

Any sudden changes – such as not boiling the kettle at the same time each morning or turning lights on in the middle of the night – will trigger an alert.

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